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Prayer and Praise

prayer requests

 posted by: li cross on 12/8/2017

Please pray that God can help me not to lost my salvation and my job in the Administration Wing, so that I can continue to preach the gospel (Jesus crucified), sorry and thank you, in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, A-Men. Read More

1 person is praying

finances please

 posted by: marie Ms. grace on 11/21/2017

Thank you very much for your prayer for a house to rent for us. We are now in a rental house which we are deeply grateful for. Please pray for the Lord to have his hand over the income needed to be able to pay the greater rent costs for us.And... Read More

1 person is praying

Please pray

 posted by: Edmund Krzeminski on 11/4/2017

[We read] In the King James Bible, Ezekiel 22:30: "And I sought for a man among them, that should make up the hedge, and stand in the gap before me for the land, that I should not destroy it: but I found none." O God, please help us... Read More

3 people are praying

salvation

 posted by: li cross on 11/3/2017

Please pray that God can help me not to lost my salvation and my job in the Administration Wing, so that I can continue to preach the gospel (Jesus crucified), sorry and thank you, in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, A-Men. Read More

4 people are praying

Job Success

 posted by: Jonathan Ashbeck on 10/27/2017

I have two part time jobs now and I am so blessed that God gave me those two jobs so please pray so that I may do well on those jobs. Read More

3 people are praying


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Do It Because You Don’t Want To

 

Do It Because You Don’t Want To 

“But I discipline my body and bring it into subjection, lest, when I have preached to others, I myself should become disqualified” (1 Corinthians 9:27).
IT’S HEALTHY TO DO SOMETHING EVERY DAY THAT WE REALLY DON’T WANT TO DO — JUST FOR THE EXERCISE. There is a great benefit in PRACTICING the art of self-discipline, that is, engaging in it regularly just for the sake of building our mental muscles.
When Paul said that he “disciplined” his body and brought it into “subjection,” he spoke of something that requires a bit of unpleasantness from time to time. By its very nature, training requires us to get out of our comfort zone. If we never call upon our “muscles” to do anything more than what they want to do, then we never gain the ability to do anything more than that. It’s just that simple. And so we ought to look for opportunities to do things that we don’t want to do. It’s one good way that we grow.
Have you ever watched someone “exercising”? Many of the bodily movements by which strength and agility are developed would be ridiculous if we did them for any reason other than training or exercise. Take sit-ups, for example. There is only one reason to do sit-ups: TO MAKE YOUR ABDOMINAL MUSCLES DO THINGS THEY DON’T WANT TO DO. No one would ever do it for any other reason except training . . . practice . . . exercise . . . discipline. When you do sit-ups, you’re demonstrating that you grasp one of life’s great principles: THERE IS VALUE IN DOING THINGS THAT DON’T WANT TO BE DONE.
Nothing is more valuable than to have our faculties — mental and spiritual, as well as physical — trained and ready to respond to important needs. But having faculties that will respond to important needs is not something that happens overnight or without any effort. When the big tests of life come along, we won’t be ready for them if we haven’t been training for them before then. So today, if there’s some unpleasant little duty that could easily be procrastinated, do it just because you don’t want to. Take that little opportunity to put the flesh in its place. Teach your body to take orders from your spirit. Someday, you’ll be mighty glad you did.
“Keep the faculty of effort alive in you by a little gratuitous exercise every day. Be systematically ascetic or heroic in little unnecessary points. Do every day or two something for no other reason than that you would rather not do it, so that when the hour of dire need draws nigh, it may find you not unnerved and untrained to stand the test” (William James).
Gary Henry – WordPoints.com
 

Reach for Holiness Before Happiness

 

Reach for Holiness Before Happiness

“Pursue peace with all people, and holiness, without which no one will see the Lord” (Hebrews 12:14).
HOLINESS IS A HIGHER PRIORITY THAN HAPPINESS. It should rank higher in our scale of values than happiness, and maintaining its presence in our lives should be a matter of more pressing concern. The pursuit of holiness should be what we’re known for.
To say that anything is more important than happiness sounds absurd to our modern ears, of course. The very idea flies in the face of popular philosophy. Even when it comes to religious philosophy, most people nowadays take it as their basic premise that God “wants us to be happy.” We even use that benchmark to decide what God’s will is in the first place. Faced with various interpretations of scriptural teaching, we choose the one that we think would make us the happiest. And if someone challenges the correctness of our decision, our reply is often predictable: “Well, I just can’t believe that God wouldn’t want me to be happy.”
But while the “pursuit of happiness” may be a social and political priority, it does not rank at the top of any scriptural list of criteria by which our conduct is to be decided. Although long-term joy, properly defined, was His objective (Hebrews 12:1-2), Jesus often chose the difficult over the easy, and the painful over the pleasant: “Not My will, but Yours, be done” (Luke 22:42).
None of this is meant to imply that happiness is unimportant. It certainly is important, to some extent. But to whatever extent happiness matters, the way to achieve it is not to make it the main objective in life, as many people do. Happiness comes mostly to those who are willing to be unhappy, if need be, while they work on goals of greater significance. God, our Creator, is a better manager of our happiness than we are, and in the long run, we’ll be happier if we seek Him first and let Him decide how much happiness we can handle without forgetting Him. If we had to, we could survive the loss of any amount of happiness, but no one can survive the absence of holiness. So that’s the thing most worth pursuing . . . and if we don’t do that, then death will be our doom.
“No man should desire to be happy who is not at the same time holy. He should spend his efforts in seeking to know and do the will of God, leaving to Christ the matter of how happy he shall be” (A. W. Tozer).
Gary Henry – WordPoints.com
 

Nostalgia: Handle with Care

 

Nostalgia: Handle with Care 

“Do not say, ‘Why were the former days better than these?’ For you do not inquire wisely concerning this” (Ecclesiastes 7:10).
IT’S HARD TO REACH FORWARD AND BACKWARD AT THE SAME TIME. Yet I fear that’s the very thing we often try to do. We say we’re reaching forward, but the pull of nostalgia can tug at our hearts so strongly that we catch ourselves trying to make the world like it USED to be rather than the way it OUGHT to be, as if “used to be” and “ought to be” were exactly synonymous. The net effect of our exertions in life is often more backward than forward.
Nostalgia is a wonderful thing, and not many folks love it any more than I do. But nostalgia must be handled with care. If we don’t watch out, it can hinder us in our journey toward God. So here are a few tips on enjoying the past in a helpful, healthful way.
(1) WHATEVER GOOD MAY HAVE BEEN DONE PREVIOUSLY, TODAY IS THE ONLY DAY ANY NEW ACTIVITY CAN BE DONE. We can enjoy the past, and we can certainly learn from it. But yesterday’s work is already done, and that work won’t suffice for today. Thinking about the past (or anything else, for that matter) can’t be a substitute for today’s action.
(2) WE MUST LEARN TO BE GRATEFUL FOR THE PAST WITHOUT WORSHIPING IT. Having the right attitude toward past, present, and future is a matter of BALANCE. If there are good things about the days gone by, we must love those things neither too little nor too much. Maintaining that balance requires making frequent adjustments.
(3) EVEN IF THE PAST WAS BETTER THAN THE PRESENT IN SOME WAYS, IT IS FRUITLESS TO WONDER WHY. None of us — not even the philosophers — have enough information to answer the question, “Why is the world changing as it is?” The farmer must stick to seed-sowing and not worry too much why the weather’s not what it used to be.
When we get to wondering “Why were the former days better than these?” we need to understand that THE PAST WASN’T REALLY AS WONDERFUL AS WE REMEMBER IT. After all, our memories are quite selective, remembering a few pleasant things and forgetting others that weren’t so pleasant. So while the good old days may do our hearts good to ponder, they don’t serve very well as a goal for the future.
“Through the centuries the people have dreamed of a Golden Age and longed for its return, unconscious that they dream of a day that has never been” (Guy E. Shipler).
Gary Henry – WordPoints.com

Higher Ground

 

Higher Ground 

“But he who looks into the perfect law of liberty and continues in it, and is not a forgetful hearer but a doer of the work, this one will be blessed in what he does” (James 1:25).
IT IS NOT FROM THINKING ALONE THAT WE MAKE SPIRITUAL PROGRESS, BUT RATHER FROM THINKING, DOING, AND THEN LEARNING FROM WHAT WE’VE DONE. Whoever makes an honest attempt to do what God’s word has taught him to do, that person, James says, “will be blessed in what he does.” We get to higher ground not by meditation alone, but by movement.
Our conscience is a cautionary faculty that warns us when we’re about to violate our principles. It was given to restrain us. But sometimes we need to be stimulated, and our conscience should do that also. It should move us to act in ways that are consistent with our principles. Often, however, we fail to act. Afraid of making a mistake, we do nothing. And consequently, we LEARN nothing. By failing to act on the best of our present understanding, we forfeit the opportunity to grow in that understanding.
Improvement is the result of examining what we’ve done. The more we do, the more we have a chance to improve. But if we wait to do anything until we think we can get it exactly right, we’ll probably do very little. Perfect conditions for action rarely present themselves, and the person who waits for them is wasting valuable time. “He who observes the wind will not sow, and he who regards the clouds will not reap” (Ecclesiastes 11:4). In the real world, we have to go ahead and do the best we can.
Spiritual growth has more than one dimension. On the one hand, it requires that we eschew evil. But on the other, it requires that we do the good that we know to do, and then learn to do even better. “You therefore, beloved, since you know this beforehand, beware lest you also fall from your own steadfastness, being led away with the error of the wicked; but grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ . . .” (2 Peter 3:17-18). Maturity comes from actions carefully considered beforehand and then carefully evaluated afterward.
“Renewal is the principle — and the process — that empowers us to move on an upward spiral of growth and change, of continuous improvement . . . Moving along the upward spiral requires us to LEARN, COMMIT, and DO on increasingly higher planes” (Stephen R. Covey).
Gary Henry – WordPoints.com

Verbiage

 

Verbiage 

“But I will come to you shortly, if the Lord wills, and I will know, not the word of those who are puffed up, but the power. For the kingdom of God is not in word but in power” (1 Corinthians 4:19-20).
IMPRESSIVE TALK ABOUT GOD IS NOT THE SAME THING AS ACTUAL LIFE IN HIM. Eloquent words about God may abound in some circles, and there is certainly no shortage today of profound discussion about the subject of spirituality. But our relationship with God is not determined by either the eloquence or the profundity of our talk. Not even the TRUTHFULNESS of our words is enough, by itself, to guarantee a real relationship with God!
It is tempting to stay in the realm of talk and never venture out into the world of action. After all, it is easy and pleasant to talk about God. When we verbalize truths about God, we not only feel a sense of spiritual satisfaction ourselves, but others also come to think of us as being wise and spiritually mature. But if we talk about God in such a way that the true emptiness of our hearts is concealed, either from others or ourselves, we are doing something that is exceedingly dangerous. As the painful realities that could draw us toward a real relationship with God are buried beneath a blanket of fine religious words, we may discover that our own verbiage has become our greatest hindrance in moving toward God. Endlessly repeating the truth about Him will have become a substitute for dealing with the truth about ourselves.
We’re perhaps familiar with the biblical warnings against words-only religion. Paul, for example, warned about “idle talkers” (Titus 1:10), indicating that such people “profess to know God, but in works they deny Him” (Titus 1:16). And Jesus Himself spoke sternly on the subject: “These people draw near to Me with their mouth, and honor Me with their lips, but their heart is far from Me” (Matthew 15:8). But are “idle talkers” just the professional imposters and the intentional hypocrites? Surely these texts have a wider application. They are a warning also to those of us who’ve slipped CARELESSLY into the assumption that if our words are good, then that is all we need to be concerned about. Intentional or not, hypocrisy is a very serious matter. The soundness of our faith involves more than the sound of our words.
“All he has rests on his tongue. His religion is something to make a noise with” (John Bunyan).
Gary Henry – WordPoints.com

Diligently Seeking God

Diligently Seeking God

Be Still!

“Be still, and know that I am God; I will be exalted among the nations, I will be exalted in the earth!” (Psalm 46:10).
BEFORE WE MAKE ANY OTHER RESPONSE TO GOD, WE MUST RESPOND TO HIM WITH RESPECT. If we don’t first dispose ourselves before Him in reverent silence, our deeds will be deficient in both strength and significance. The obedience that most highly honors God is an obedience deeply grounded in awe and wonder. “Be still,” God says to us, “and know that I am God.”
There is a time to speak, but there is also a time to be silent. Nowadays most of us have too little acquaintance with any silence that could be called worshipful. We seek God talkatively, rather than respectfully. In the relationship between God and man, we are doing too much of the talking. We may pause in our words once in a while, but even then, our minds are not reverentially silent before God. They are still racing at full throttle, fueled by the frenetic self-concern of our busyness. And the fact that the busyness is RELIGIOUS busyness doesn’t do much to lessen the problem.
There is no question that the majesty of God calls for a response from us. Serving God is not a merely passive matter. But we must take the time to stand still and be lost in wonder before we rush out to do God’s bidding. And even as we actively carry out God’s instructions, we must often pause in silence to steep our minds in His grandeur. If we fail to do so, our activity will lack the essential ingredient of reverence. Without the qualities that come from reverence, our service will be shallow and our lives will be little more than an accident waiting to happen. It is stillness and silence that produce the best doers and speakers of God’s word. And the “louder” the world, the harder these are to come by.
In this age of the world, we’ve discovered how to multiply our own words vastly, and we’re frequently reminded of the power of these words. But we dare not forget their danger. “The Lord is in His holy temple. Let all the earth keep silence before Him” (Habakkuk 2:20).
“With our loss of the sense of majesty has come the further loss of religious awe and consciousness of the divine Presence. We have lost our spirit of worship and our ability to withdraw inwardly to meet God in adoring silence” (A. W. Tozer).
Gary Henry – WordPoints.com

 

Patience While We Make Progress

Patience While We Make Progress

“Now to Him who is able to keep you from stumbling, and to present you faultless before the presence of His glory with exceeding joy, to God our Savior, who alone is wise, be glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and forever. Amen” (Jude 24-25).
AS LONG AS WE REMAIN IN THIS WORLD, IMPERFECTIONS WILL BE A FACT OF LIFE. If we’ve obeyed the gospel and become Christians, we’re somewhere along a path that leads to perfect holiness. Some have been Christians longer and are a bit further down the path than others, but none of us, not even the most mature, can say that we’re without sin (1 John 1:8-10). We’re all works in progress. So since it’s God’s plan for our sanctification to be accomplished gradually through a PROCESS, we need to be patient with God (and with ourselves) while the process is underway.
Although we make mistakes and lapse into old habits, God is able, as Jude wrote, to keep us from falling away from Him completely. He can strengthen us and present us “faultless before the presence of His glory with exceeding joy.” We should discipline our thinking and hold on to the confidence that God knows what He’s doing and is perfectly capable of removing the remainder of sin from our lives. Meanwhile, we must not expect perfection before the time for that perfection arrives (1 John 3:2-3).
This is no argument for complacency or careless indulgence in sin. “How shall we who died to sin live any longer in it?” (Romans 6:2). We’re simply saying that as we reach forward to God’s holiness, we must not demand a perfection of ourselves that is impossible at this point. We must accept the fact that we’re on a JOURNEY.
The important thing right now, then, is not perfection but progress. No less than absolute perfection should be our goal, but as we work toward that goal, we’ll make more progress if we concentrate on taking the steps that are immediately before us. Those are always steps that we’re capable of taking, and we should be both THANKFUL to take them and CONTENT to take them.
“The rising of devotion in an ordinary soul is like the dawning of a new day. Darkness is not driven away immediately. Light comes in small increments, moment by moment” (Francis de Sales).
Gary Henry – WordPoints.com 

Cooperation with God

THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

Our culture places a high premium on competition, and we have lived this competitive spirit for so long that in happens to us in all we do. We think that competition rather than cooperation is the key to success. This competitive nature we have been taught and we have caught becomes part of all our relationships including our relationship with God. We are made to be in a continuous state of transforming, maturing spiritually. We cannot get all of what God has for us at once or even in a lifetime. God continues to reveal God’s self to us as much as we can handle, and when our self-will is competing with God’s will then we are limited in what we can handle. God cannot help us grow. Ask yourself, am I competing with God or am I cooperating with God?

MEDITATION FOR THE DAY

Cooperation with God is the great necessity for our lives. All else follows naturally. Cooperation with God is the result of our consciousness of God’s presence. Guidance is bound to come to us as we live more and more with God, as our consciousness becomes more and more attuned to the great Consciousness of the universe. We must have many quiet times when we not so much ask to be shown and led by God, as to feel and realize God’s presence. New spiritual growth comes naturally from cooperation with God.

PRAYER FOR THE DAY

I pray that God may supply me with strength and show me the direction in which He wants me to grow. I pray that these things may come naturally from my cooperation with God.  

Changing our Minds

THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

Our minds are like fertile soil, we get out of it what we put into it. If we plant seeds of dissension, anger, bitterness, envy, selfishness then this is what we will reap. When our lives are not where we want it to be it is not always something in the world that needs to be changed. Quite often, it is something inside of us that needs to be changed. We may need to begin sowing different seed into our hearts, minds, and spirits. Our minds are filled with seed we have been taught and seed we have caught and we must pluck out the old harvest and replace it with the seed of love. Ask yourself am I where I want to be spiritually?

MEDITATION FOR THE DAY

I should strive for a friendliness and helpfulness that will affect all who come near to me. I should try to see something to love in them. I should welcome them, bestow little courtesies and understandings on them, and help them if they ask for help. I must send no one away without a word of cheer, a feeling that I really care about them. God may have put the impulse in some despairing one's mind to come to me. I must not fail God by repulsing that person. They may not want to communicate with me unless they are sure of a warm welcome.

PRAYER FOR THE DAY

I pray that I may warmly welcome all who come to me for help. I pray that I may make them feel that I really care.  

Salvation Insurance

THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

Every time we attend Bible study or worship services, we learn something new to add to our salvation insurance. Every time we say the Lord's Prayer, every time we have a quiet time before breakfast, we're paying a premium on our salvation insurance. Every time we help another lost person come into a relationship with God, we're making a large payment on our salvation insurance. We're making sure that our salvation policy doesn't lapse. Ask yourself, am I building up an endowment in serenity, peace, and happiness that will put me on easy street for the rest of my life?
MEDITATION FOR THE DAY
I gain faith by my own experience of God's power in my life. The constant, persistent recognition of God's spirit in all my personal relationships, the ever accumulating weight of evidence in support of God's guidance, the numberless instances in which seeming chance or wonderful coincidence can be traced to God's purpose in my life. All these things gradually engender a feeling of wonder, humility, and gratitude to God. These in turn are followed by a more sure and abiding faith in God and His purposes.
PRAYER FOR THE DAY
I pray that my faith may be strengthened every day. I pray that I may find confirmation of my life in the good things that have come into my life.
  
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